Three warming vegan soups for cold winter nights

Veganuary may be coming to an end… but that doesn’t mean we should start loading up on the bacon butties. Incorporating more plant-based meals into our everyday repertoire can only be a good thing, so let’s get started with these tasty vegan soups to warm the body and soul.


Carrot & ginger soup with cashew cream

Carrot & ginger soup with cashew cream
Serves 4 / Hands on time 35 mins / Total time 50 mins + soaking
You’ll need: A food processor
1 tbs olive oil
600g carrots, peeled and roughly chopped
1 white onion, peeled and roughly chopped
3 garlic cloves, peeled and bashed
1 large knob of ginger (roughly 50g), grated
½ tsp ground nutmeg
1 can chickpeas, drained
1 ½ litre of vegetable stock, I use 1 ½ Knorr stock pots
Cashew cream
150g cashews
¼ tsp salt
1 small garlic clove, crushed
Squeeze of lemon juice
150ml water

Method
1. The night before, soak 150g of cashews in a bowl of water overnight.
2. Preheat your oven to 220°C/200°C fan/400°F/gas mark 7. Peel and roughly chop the carrots and put them in a large roasting tray, along with the grated ginger, chopped onion, bashed garlic, nutmeg and olive oil. Season well with salt and pepper and give it all a good mix, before roasting in the oven for 30 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, make the cashew cream. Rinse and drain the cashews and put them in a food processor along with 150ml of water, a crushed garlic clove, a squeeze of lemon juice, salt and pepper. Blitz for around 5-7 minutes or until you have a smooth creamy consistency. Put to one side.
3. Once the carrots are roasted, carefully pour them into a large cooking pot before adding a litre of vegetable stock and a drained can of chickpeas. Season with salt and pepper and bring to the boil. Simmer for 5 minutes before blending either in a food processor or with a hand blender.
4. Pour into bowls, top with lashing of cashew cream and serve with bread.


Winter ribollita
Winter ribollita

Winter ribollita
Serves 4 / Hands on time 10 mins / Total time 50 mins 

1 tsp olive oil
1 white onion, finely chopped
3 garlic cloves, sliced
2 celery sticks, chopped
1 parsnip, peeled and chopped
1 carrot, peeled and chopped
½ tsp salt
1 can plum tomatoes
1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
1 litre vegetable stock, I use 2 Knorr stock pots
Handful fresh parsley, chopped
100g cavalo nero or kale, roughly chopped
Extra virgin olive oil to serve

Method
1. In a large saucepan or pot with a lid, add 1 tsp of olive oil over a low to medium heat. Add the chopped onion, garlic, celery, parsnip, carrot and the salt. Give it a good stir, cover with a lid and leave to soften for 20 mins, stirring occasionally.
2. Add a can of plum tomatoes and break them up with a spoon. Add the drained and rinsed chickpeas and the vegetable stock before upping the heat and bringing to the boil. Simmer uncovered for 15 mins before adding the cavalo nero and parsley. Give it a stir and cook for a further 5 mins.
3. Take off the heat, ladle into bowls and top with a good drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and serve with crusty bread and good crack of black pepper.


Fragrant Coconut Soup
Fragrant Coconut Soup

Fragrant coconut soup
Serves 2 / Hands on time 25 mins / Total time 30 mins

2 cans light coconut milk
1 vegetable stock pot, I use Knorr
2 sticks of lemon grass, bashed (I use a rolling pin)
½ white onion, roughly chopped
2 garlic cloves, peeled and bashed
1 medium sized red chilli, deseeded and roughly chopped
1 knob of ginger, roughly grated
2 tsp caster sugar
28g bunch coriander, chopped
145g nest of rice noodles
2 tsp miso paste or light soy sauce
5 chestnut mushrooms, roughly sliced
2 bulbs of pak choy, roughly chopped
3 Chinese leaves or a handful for kale, roughly chopped
Juice of a lime

Method
1. In a large saucepan, add the 2 cans of coconut milk, vegetable stock cube or pot, chopped onion, chilli, garlic, ginger, bashed lemongrass and sugar. Roughly chop the coriander stalks (saving the leaves) and add to the coconut milk. Give it a good stir and bring to the boil then reduce to a simmer for 15 minutes.
2. Meanwhile, cook your rice noodles in small saucepan according to the packet instructions. Once cooked, drain and cover in a stream of cold water until completely cold (this will stop the noodles from continuing to cook). Drain again and divide the noodles into two large soup bowls. Put to one side.
3. Turn your attention back to the soup and give it a quick stir. Roughly chop the remaining coriander leaves, Chinese leaves, pak choy and mushrooms.
4. After 15 minutes your soup should be well infused and fragrant. Over a large bowl, carefully pour your soup through a sieve. Discard the contents of the sieve and pour the remaining soup back into your saucepan.
4. Stir through 2 tsp of red miso paste and add the pak choy, mushrooms and Chinese leaf. Give it a good stir and cook on a medium heat for a few minutes or until the veg is tender. Take the saucepan off the heat, squeeze over the lime juice and stir. Finally, ladle over the cooked noodles and top with fresh coriander.


If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.

 



Peppermint creams: The classic edible Christmas gift

A vintage classic and reminiscent of my school days, peppermint creams make the perfect and utterly delicious edible gift! So why not forgo the After Eight mints this Christmas and pass around a plate of homemade peppermint creams? My mini versions are dipped in dark chocolate and cut into bitesize rounds but it is Christmas, so get creative and dig out whatever cookie cutter you have and get stamping!


Bitesize peppermint creams
Bitesize peppermint creams

Bitesize peppermint creams
Makes 20-30 mini rounds / Hands on time 20 mins / Total time 40 mins + setting time / V Gf
You’ll need: Baking paper, rolling pin and a small round cookie cutter
300g icing sugar (plus extra for dusting)
¼ tsp peppermint flavouring
1 egg (the white separate from the yolk)
1 tsp of lemon juice
90g Green and Black’s Organic 70% dark chocolate


Method
1. Separate the egg yolk from the egg white in a small bowl and discard the egg yolk. In a large mixing bowl, sieve the icing sugar before adding half the egg white along with a ¼ tsp of peppermint flavouring and a tsp of lemon juice.
2. Mix slowly with a wooden spoon to avoid the icing sugar flying everywhere. The mix will seem very dry but keep mixing until the icing sugar comes together to form a firm dough. If you need more liquid add more egg white.
3. Once the dough has formed, remove the spoon from the bowl and knead the dough with your hands – like you would a bread dough. If the dough is too sticky you may need to add more icing sugar.
4. Line a large chopping board with a piece of baking paper and sprinkle with icing sugar, put to one side. Cut out another large piece of baking paper and place on a clean dry surface. Sprinkle with icing sugar and turn the dough out onto it before sprinkling with more icing sugar. Roll out the mixture with a rolling pin to roughly 1 centimetre thick.
5. Insert the cookie cutter into the dough, give it a twist and extract a little round of dough. Place the round onto the lined chopping board and repeat (gathering up and rolling out the dough if necessary). Cover the peppermint creams loosely with cling film and leave to set for at least 3 hours or preferable over-night.
6. Once set, it’s time to melt the chocolate. Fill a small saucepan halfway with water and bring to the boil. Once boiling, take off the heat and place a small heat-proof bowl over it. Break in the pieces of chocolate and wait for it to melt (try not to stir it until nearly all the chocolate has melted). Meanwhile, line a baking tray or cooling rack with baking paper sprinkled with icing sugar.
7. Once melted, tilt the bowl slightly to the side to allow a deeper pool of chocolate for you to dip your peppermint creams into. One by one, dip each peppermint cream into the chocolate, wait for the drips to stop and place on your newly lined cooling rack. Repeat until all of your peppermint creams are coated.
8. Leave in a cool dry place for the chocolate to set. Once set, carefully peel the peppermint creams off the baking paper before boxing up and gifting to a lucky family member or friend.

Bitesize peppermint creams
Bitesize peppermint creams

For more Christmassy ideas visit my new Christmas page.


For more foodie blogs, recipes and courses, visit learningwithexperts.com.


 

Is that an aubergine in your pocket or are you … Oh, it is an aubergine

Aubergine & Chickpea Stew

At their best from July to September, now is the perfect time to get your hands on the nations favourite emoji. The aubergine. With its glossy purple skin and spongy centre, this vegetable loves nothing more than to soak up flavours and I have just the recipe! This aubergine and chickpea stew is warm with cinnamon spice but fresh with mint and yogurt, perfect to see out the last of the Summer nights before welcoming Autumn in all her golden glory.


Aubergine & chickpea stew
Serves 4 / Hands on time 30 mins / Total time 1 hr / V Vn Gf Df 
1 tsp olive oil
1 white onion, finely diced
2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
2 aubergines, cut into large chunks
6 medium sized tomatoes, cut into eighths
1 can tinned chickpeas, drained
500ml vegetable stock, I use Knorr stock pots
3 bay leaves
1 ½ tsp cinnamon
1 tsp smoked paprika
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp dried parsley
100ml *vegan red wine
To serve 
Handful of fresh mint leaves
Greek or dairy free yogurt (optional)
Drizzle of Pomora extra virgin olive oil
Serve with crusty bread or couscous


Method

  1. Finely chop the onion and the garlic and add them to a large cooking pot with a teaspoon of oil. Over a medium heat, sweat the onions and garlic for around 5 minutes or until softened (if the onions are getting a little too much colour, add a dash of water to the pot to help them to steam).
  2. Add 1 tsp of cumin, turmeric, smoked paprika and 1 and a half tsp of cinnamon then give it a good stir. Add a little water to the mix if again it’s looking a little dry and to allow the spices to release their lovely aromas.
  3. Cook the spices for a couple of minutes before adding the freshly chopped tomatoes, 500ml of vegetable stock, 100ml red wine, the aubergine chunks, drained chickpeas, 3 bay leaves and 1 tsp of dried parsley. Give it a good mix and season well with salt and pepper. Bring to the boil.
  4. Turn the heat down to a simmer, pop the lid a jar and cook for 15 minutes stirring occasionally. After 15 minutes, take the lid off, give it another stir and continue to cook without the lid for a further 15 minutes (this allows the sauce to thicken). Meanwhile, use this time to prepare your chosen accompaniment – I like to serve it with couscous or with a loaf of crusty bread on warmer days and mashed potato on cooler ones.
  5. Take the stew off the heat and carefully pick out the bay leaves. Divide into bowls along your chosen accompaniment, a generously sprinkle of fresh mint, yogurt (optional), and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.
    Aubergine & Chickpea Stew
    Aubergine & Chickpea Stew

    For more foodie blogs, recipes and courses, visit learningwithexperts.com.

Broccoli fusilli with kale & walnut pesto

Broccoli fusilli with kale & walnut pesto

In the back of the vegetable crisper it waits patiently. Its bushy green head turning ever so slightly yellow, it’s pine coloured leaves wilt and shrivel whilst its branches begin to soften. But it doesn’t have to be this way! Liberate your head of broccoli by chopping it up (stalk and all) and serving it al dente stirred through wholemeal pasta with a vibrant kale and walnut pesto. Delish! Alternatively, leave the dish to cool fully before refrigerating and serving as a summery accompaniment to any barbecue. Adding crumbled feta or parmesan shavings add a bit of extra indulgence or leave it as it is to please any plant-based guests you may be entertaining.


Broccoli fusilli with kale and walnut pesto
Serves 2 / Hands on time 15 mins / Total time 20 mins / V Vn Df
You’ll need: A food processor
50g walnuts (about 2 handfuls)
½ regular sized garlic clove, peeled and roughly sliced
1 handful of kale, heavier stems removed and discarded
20-30g fresh basil
4 tbs Pomora extra virgin olive oil
150g wholemeal brown fusilli
1 head of broccoli


Method
1. Put a full kettle on to boil and pour the pasta into a large saucepan (big enough to accommodate an entire chopped head broccoli).
2. Meanwhile, make the pesto by peeling and roughly chopping the garlic before adding it to a food processor, along with the walnuts and a handful of kale (heavier stems removed). Blitz on full for about 10 seconds or until you have a rough paste.
2. Add the fresh basil, a good sprinkle of salt and pepper and give it another blitz – this time for a bit longer until you have a slightly smoother paste.
3. Lastly, add 3 tbs of extra virgin olive oil before blending for a final time (how long you blend is up to you depending on how smooth you like your pesto). Put to one side.
4. Pour the boiling water from the kettle over the pasta and add a half a tsp of salt to the water. Use more water than you would usually as you will need to boil the broccoli in it too. Cook the pasta according to the packet instructions until 4 mins before the end of the cooking time. Meanwhile, pull he florets off the broccoli with your fingers and chop into big chunks include the stalk and the leaves.
5. Four minutes before the pasta is cooked add the broccoli florets to the pasta pan and boil for the remaining cooking time.
6. Strain the pasta and the broccoli well before transferring back into the saucepan off the heat. Add the pesto and stir well until evenly distributed. Divide onto plates and serve immediately with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil and a crack of black pepper.

Broccoli fusilli with kale & walnut pesto

If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


V – Vegetarian    Vn – Vegan     Df – Dairy free



Middle Eastern broth

Middle Eastern foul (ful) soup

OK, so I’m using the word ‘foul’ loosely, as this soup doesn’t resemble a traditional Middle Eastern foul at all – but in my defence, Sainsbury’s don’t sell fava beans and I wanted to make it more of a soup than a dip. So sue me. Please don’t sue me, I haven’t got any money. It’s January, and all I have is a can of chickpeas and a rather stale mince pie that I am currently eating. Happy New Year, everyone!


Middle Eastern broth (foul)
Serves 2 / hands on time 25 mins / total time 30 mins / V Vn* Df Gf
1 tsp rapeseed oil
1 large white onion, sliced
500ml weak veg stock (I use ½ a vegetable Knorr stock pot)
1 tsp sea salt flakes
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp ground cumin
1 can chickpeas or fava beans (if you can get them)
2 eggs
Handful parsley, finely chopped
Extra virgin olive oil to serve
Pickled turnips, sliced to serve (optional) – See TIP
2 pita bread to serve (optional)
Tahini dressing:
1 tbs tahini
½ lemon, juiced
1 tbs boiling water
Pinch of salt


TIP: Pickled turnips are notoriously hard to find, I went to my local Mediterranean supermarket in Kentish town but you can buy them here. Alternatively, leave it out altogether or substitute for pickled red cabbage.


Make it vegan: Forgo the boiled eggs.


Method
1. Add the oil to a heavy bottomed pot over a medium heat. Peel and slice the onion and add to the pot along with a tsp of salt. Sauté for 5-7 mins with the lid on until the onions start to soften – add a dash of water to help the onions steam. Now is a good time to boil the eggs. Put a kettle on to boil and add 2 eggs to a small saucepan. Pour over the boiled water until both eggs are fully submerged and bring to the boil before leaving to simmer – the eggs need to hard boil so no need to time them, simply leave them bubbling away.
2. Add the cumin and the coriander and cook off the spices for a further 2 mins before adding the weak vegetable stock. Up the heat and bring to the boil before adding the chickpeas or fava beans. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10 mins.
3. To make the tahini dressing, combine all the ingredients in a small bowl and mix until combined and put to one side. Finely chop the fresh parsley.
4. After 10 mins, take the onion and bean broth off the heat, pop the lid on and put to one side. Drain the boiling water off the eggs and give them a good burst of cold water until they are cool enough to handle and peel.
5. To assemble your soup, divide the broth into bowls and top with sliced boiled eggs, pickled turnips, fresh parsley, and a good drizzle of tahini dressing and extra virgin olive oil.

Middle Eastern foul (ful) soup

If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


V – Vegetarian.    Vn – Vegan’s forgo the eggs     Df – Dairy free
Gf – I use Knorr vegetable stock pots because they are gluten free but other stock pots/cubes may not be.



Bang bang cauliflower bites

Bang bang cauliflower bites

Now, it has to be said, I’m not a huge fan of cauliflower. This can be problematic – especially these days, as it seems to have become the go-to vegetarian dish in most restaurants. Whole-roasted, salt-baked, deep-fried, curried, pickled, pureed, battered and sliced into steaks, cauliflower is thrust upon my plate at any given moment. So, allow me to thrust my bang-bang cauliflower bites onto yours and see how you like it – I like it very much.


Bang bang cauliflower bites
Serves 2 as a starter or makes 1 tray of canapés / hands on time 15 mins / total time 45 mins / V Vn Df 🌶🌶
You’ll need: Non-stick baking tray and cocktail sticks (if serving as canapés)
1 medium cauliflower, cut into florets (roughly 550g)
1 tbs extra virgin olive oil
2 tbs sweet chilli sauce, I use Blue Dragon 
1 ½ tsp Sriracha + extra for serving
Juice of ½  a lime
½ tsp sea salt flakes
2 handfuls panko breadcrumbs
½ tsp smoked paprika
Small handful of fresh coriander to serve (optional) 


Method
1. Preheat an oven to 220°C/200°C fan/425°F/gas mark 7. Prepare the cauliflower by removing the leaves and the stalk (cauliflower leaves are delicious and great in a stir fry, so don’t feel you need to bin them). Pull apart the florets and chop the larger florets in half or into smaller bitesize pieces.
2. In a large bowl, whisk together the olive oil, chilli sauce, Sriracha and the juice of half a lime until combined. Add the cauliflower florets and stir until well coated.
3. On a large plate, add panko breadcrumbs and sprinkle with smoked paprika. Give it a stir before spooning over half the coated florets. Turn the cauliflower over in the breadcrumbs until each is well coated and place on a non-stick baking tray or a tray lined with baking paper. Repeat this process with the remaining cauliflower and bake in the oven for 30 minutes.
4. Serve immediately sprinkled with freshly chopped coriander and a small bowl of Sriracha for dipping.
5. If you’re making canapés, skew each floret with a cocktail stick and serve along side a dipping bowl of Sriracha for your guests to enjoy.

Bang bang cauliflower bites

If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


V– Vegetarian      Vn– Vegan      Df– Dairy free    🌶🌶 – Medium hot



Turkish eggs on pita

Turkish eggs with pita

This is an oldie but a goodie, and a recipe I’ve been making most weekends for the past four years. Partly because it’s my boyfriend favourite and partly because it’s cheap as chips – which is good, as I seem to have misplaced all my money. Either that, or I’ve spent it on simply breathing in this overpriced town… and Celine Dion tickets. I mean, what’s the point in living in London if you can’t afford a Friday night Deliveroo? #middleclassproblems. Oh well, at least I’ll get nice and thin, especially if we get a no-deal Brexit. Come on Boris, do it for halloumi!


Turkish eggs on pita
Serves 1 / Hands on time 10 mins / Total time 10 mins /
You’ll  need:
Non-stick frying pan preferably with a lid 
Spray rapeseed oil
2 eggs
1 brown pita bread
3 tbs Greek yogurt
Small handful fresh mint, chopped
Small handful of fresh dill, chopped
¼ tsp smoked paprika
Pinch of chilli flakes
1 tsp garlic extra virgin olive oil (if you don’t have garlic oil simply crush ½ a garlic clove into the yogurt and use regular extra virgin olive oil)
3 pickled chillies, stalks removed (optional) 


TIP: This is a great way to use up Greek yogurt you have left over from another recipe. 


Method
1. Roughly chop the mint and the dill and put to one side. In a small bowl, add the yogurt and season with salt. If not using garlic oil, stir the grated garlic straight into the yogurt.
2. Spray a small non-stick frying pan with rapeseed oil and place over a medium heat and allow the oil to heat up for a couple of minutes. Crack in the eggs and fry until you have set whites and runny yolks – to make sure my eggs are perfectly set, I like to put the lid on the pan for the last minute to allow the steam to cook the top part of the eggs.
3. Meanwhile toast the pitta and using a knife, butterfly open on a plate. Add the yogurt to the centre of the bread and spread it out using the back of a spoon. Top with the fried eggs and liberally sprinkle over the herbs, smoked paprika and the chilli flakes. Remove the stalks from the pickled chillies, arrange them on top and drizzle over the garlic or extra virgin olive oil.

Turkish eggs with pita

If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


V – Vegetarian


Middle Eastern pita nachos

Middle Eastern pita nachos
Middle Eastern pita nachos
Middle Eastern pita nachos

Sometimes when I don’t know what to write about, I refer to a list in my iPhone Notes that is inventively called ‘stories to write about’. This list is made up of a collection anecdotes, stories and quotes that I feel are noteworthy, funny, or just outright weird. The list is ongoing, but I rarely look at it, let alone read it as tend to add to it after I’ve had a few wines. Anyway, after an uncharacteristically dull week, I thought I’d rummage through the archives and found this little gem…
“Jamie ate a woodlouse off his chest after mistaking it for a beansprout.” That was all it said. Not context, no backstory, no nothing… Still, it did the job.

Anyhoo, let’s move on to some beany deliciousness. Inspired by Nigella’s beef and aubergine fatteh recipe I thought I’d have a go at making my own vegetarian equivalent. I loved the idea of using pitta chips as a base and topping them with gorgeous Middle Eastern ingredients and flavours. The result was hearty, wholesome and pretty as a picture.


Middle Eastern pita nachos
Serves 2 / Hands on time 25 mins / Total time 40 mins /
V 
1 tbs rapeseed oil
2 wholemeal pita breads
1 onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, sliced
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp ground coriander
1 tsp salt
Pinch chili flakes
1 medium sized aubergine, cut into small cubes
1 tbs tomato puree
1 can chopped tomatoes
1 can cannellini beans (you can use any can of beans), rinsed and drained
2 tomatoes, sliced
To serve
80g vegetarian feta cheese
Pomegranate seeds
Handful, chopped fresh mint
Sumac (optional)

 


TIP: The bean mixture actually makes enough for four people. This is suitable for freezing once cooled fully and stored in an airtight container. 


Method
1. Preheat an oven to 200°C/180°C fan/400°F/gas mark 6 and line a baking tray with baking paper. Cut the pita bread into triangles and place on the baking tray. Add a tbs of rapeseed oil into a small dish and using a brush, paint each piece with oil on both sides, before seasoning well with salt and pepper. Bake the pita in the oven for 5 mins before flipping each pita triangle over and baking for a further 2 mins. Remove from the oven and put to one side.
2. In a large saucepan or cooking pot with a lid, add a drizzle of rapeseed oil over a medium heat. Once hot, add the chopped onions, garlic and aubergine cubes and stir well. Cover with a lid and leave to cook for 5 mins.
3. Meanwhile, slice the tomatoes and drain and rinse the beans. Once softened, stir in the cumin, coriander, salt and chilli flakes. Add a dash of water and stir again, cooking for a couple more minutes.
4. Mix in the tomato puree before adding the tinned tomatoes, cannellini beans, sliced tomato and 3 tbs of water. Season with salt and pepper and bring to the boil. Turn down the heat slightly and simmer uncovered for 15 mins, stirring occasionally. Meanwhile, chop the fresh mint and prepare the pomegranate seeds.
5. Once cooked, take off the heat and divide the pita chips onto 2 plates. Top generously with the bean mixture and crumble over the feta and sprinkle with mint and pomegranate seeds. Serve drizzled with extra virgin olive oil and a dusting of sumac.

Middle Eastern pita nachos
Middle Eastern pita nachos


If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


V– Vegetarian – The bean mixture is suitable for home freezing once cooled. Consume within 3 months.



Celeriac baked rice ​with goats cheese

Celeriac baked rice with goats cheese
Celariac baked rice with goats cheese
Celeriac baked rice with goats cheese

They say don’t judge a book by its cover, although it’s hard not to when you’re staring down at the misshapen, ugly face of a celeriac. Its knobbly, gnarly and often hairy skin looks like something out of a science fiction film.
Like a lot of people, I am guilty of overlooking this vegetable, but I felt sorry for it sitting on the shelf next to the prettier and cutely named munchkin pumpkin – the celeriac never have a chance. So I took his ugly mug home and lovingly peeled, chopped and roasted him in this delicious rice dish. It’s what he would have wanted.


Celeriac baked rice ​with goats cheese
Serves 4 / Hands on time 30 mins / Total time 1 hr 20 mins / V Gf
You’ll need: A deep oven-proof casserole dish
2 tsp rapeseed oil
1 white onion, finely chopped
4 cloves of garlic, peeled and sliced
1 medium sized celeriac (roughly 650g), peeled and cut into chunks
½ tsp garlic granules
½ tsp sea salt
Pinch of cayenne pepper
Pinch chilli flakes
500ml vegetable stock, I use 1 Knorr stock pot
150g brown basmati rice
4 rosemary sprigs
200g vegetarian goats cheese (including rind)
100g black olives, drained and halved
Handful of parsley, chopped to serve


TIP: If making for two, half the recipe and use a smaller baking dish.


Method
1. Preheat an oven to 220°C/200°C fan/428°F/gas mark 7. Add the chopped onion and the garlic to a deep casserole dish along with the rapeseed oil, garlic granules, sea salt, black pepper, cayenne pepper and a pinch of chilli flakes. Give it all a good stir.
2. Peel and cut the celeriac into large chunks and add to the dish and mix well. Add the rice and pour over the vegetable stock and stir carefully. Make sure the rice is fully immersed under the stock before adding the rosemary springs. Cover the dish in a layer of tin foil and bake in the oven for 45 mins.
3. Meanwhile, roughly chop the goats cheese, black olives and parsley.
4. Once cooked, remove from the oven and put the foil to one side. Taste the rice to check if it’s cooked – if the rice is still a little tough, cover in foil and return to the oven and cook for a further 5-10 mins. If cooked, sprinkle over the cheese and the black olives and return to the oven, covered in foil for a further 10 mins or until the cheese is melted.
5. Finish sprinkled with fresh parsley and serve with a simple green salad.

Celeriac baked rice with goats cheese
Celeriac baked rice with goats cheese


If you’ve had a go at making any of my recipes, I’d love to hear from you. Follow me now @corrieheale and tag your recipe pictures using #corriesrabbitfood.


V– Vegetarian.   Gf– Gluten free



Spring green egg fried rice

Spring green egg fried rice
Spring green egg fried rice
Spring green egg fried rice

August. Is. Evil! Sure, the weather’s nice, and for one blissful month, I don’t have to share my commute with hundreds of school children, but just as I’m about to pour myself a well-deserved gin and tonic and plan the weekend ahead, I notice that I don’t have a single weekend free until mid-September. NOOOOOO! Weddings, Christenings, birthdays and reunions clog up my iPhone calendar like virtual turds that just won’t flush. I decide to leave the glass and take the bottle of gin to my wardrobe, where I stare blankly before deciding which outfits I can get away with wearing at least twice.

Four weeks on and I have successfully godmothered, danced and drunk my way through the wedding season. So it will come as no surprise that when I finally get a weekend to do what I want to do, I come down with a disgusting cold.
“At least you’re not an American prisoner of war in Vietnam” Jamie says, rather unsympathetically. Yes, well, I guess there’s always that I think, as I reach for the already empty box of tissues.

And what has any of this got to do with egg-fried rice? Admittedly, not much, apart from the fact that egg-fried rice was the only thing I managed to pull together before I collapsed into my bed for a few days. Top with a fried egg and serve drizzled with soy sauce.


Spring green egg fried rice
Serves 2 / Hands on time 20 mins / Total time 20 mins / V Df
You’ll need: One small and one large frying pan
3 tsp sesame oil
3 spring onions, sliced into strips (keeping a little back for garnish)
2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped
1 inch knob of ginger, grated
4 eggs (2 beaten)
80g spring greens, chopped cabbage or kale (roughly two handfuls)
30g frozen peas
250g cooked brown basmati rice
1½ tbs light soy sauce

Method
1. Prepare a large frying and a small frying pan by adding 1 tsp of sesame oil to each. Put the large frying pan on a medium to high heat and allow the oil to warm. Meanwhile chop the spring onions, garlic and grate the ginger. Add these to the pan and cook for a few minutes until they start to soften.
2. Add the beaten egg and allow to cook for 30 seconds before using a spoon to break up the egg. Add the chopped greens and the frozen peas along with a dash of water to help them steam. Allow to cook for another couple of minutes.
3. Meanwhile, put the smaller frying pan on a medium to high heat and crack in both eggs. Fry until the white is set but the yolk is still soft.
4. Whilst the eggs are cooking, add the cooked rice, soy sauce and a tsp of sesame oil to the greens and cook for a further 3 minutes. Finally, divide into bowls and serve topped with a fried egg and a sprinkling of chopped spring onions.

Spring green egg fried rice
Spring green egg fried rice

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V– Vegetarian    Df– Dairy free