Leek & cheese muffins

Leek and cheese muffins
Leek and cheese muffins
Leek and cheese muffins

Muffins seemed like a good idea until I realised I’d have to turn the oven on in my already stiflingly-hot flat. What the hell was I thinking? It’s 30°c in London today, I should be lying under a tree somewhere, sucking on a Calippo and reading a sonnet. But no, instead, I’m angrily chopping leeks and grating cheese in a bid to jazz up my breakfasts. Was it worth it? Well, it was for Jamie. I’d only eaten one before he got to them – they never had a chance.


Leek & cheese muffins
Makes 6 large or 12 regular muffins / Hands on time 20 mins / Total time 45 mins + cooling ❄ Mf
Dry ingredients 
2 leeks (150g), finely diced
100g Parmesan* or vegetarian Italian hard cheese, grated
Few sprigs of Thyme, leaves picked
1/4 tsp Nutmeg
1/2 tsp dried parsley
1/2 tsp herbs de Provence
1 tbs pumpkin seeds (extra for sprinkling)
200g spelt or wholemeal flour
50g oats
2 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp bicarbonate of soda
Salt and pepper
Wet ingredients
2 large eggs
250g semi-skimmed milk
4 tbs rapeseed oil
1 tsp Dijon mustard


Mf– Meat and fish free    – Suitable for home freezing    
*Parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiani) is always made using animal rennet, therefore it is not vegetarian. Substitute for Italian hard cheese if applicable.
❄ To freeze, cool fully before wrapping individually in a few layers of clingfilm and freeze for up to 3 months.


Method
1. Preheat an oven to 200°C/180°C fan/ 400F/gas mark 6. Line a tin with muffin cases and finely dice your leeks – put both to one side. Combine the dry ingredients together (excluding the leeks and a small handful of grated parmesan) in a large bowl and give it a good mix.
2. In a separate smaller bowl, whisk together the wet ingredients until fully incorporated.

3. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry and stir with a wooden spoon until roughly combined, being careful not to over-mix. Add the diced leeks and stir until evenly distributed.
4. Evenly spoon into the muffins cases and top with a sprinkling pumpkin seeds and a little parmesan. Bake in the oven for 20 mins for 12 muffins or 25-30 mins for 6 large muffins. The muffins are cooked when a toothpick is inserted and comes out clean. Leave to rest in the tin for 5 minuets before turning out onto a cooling rack. Serve warm with butter or leave to cool completely and enjoy on the go.
TO STORE: Either in an airtight container and gobble up within a couple of days or freeze and defrost on demand (that’s what I do).

Leek and cheese muffins
Leek and cheese muffins

If you’ve had a go at making my muffins or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com

Herby chickpea salad

Chickpea salad
Chickpea salad
Chickpea salad

Is it sad that the most exciting thing to happen to me this month was managing to get a rather swanky pair of gardening gloves for a pound in Waitrose? Maybe it has something to do with turning 34 last week, or the fact I now have a roof terrace for the first time in three years. Whatever it is, my fingers have officially turned green, and I like it!
As we’ve all been huffing and puffing in this insufferable heatwave (myself included), my little garden has been thriving. My cherry tomato plant is heavy with fruit, my lavender has been attracting local bees and I now have enough mint to make one mojito #thegoodlife.
Of course, it hasn’t all been plain sailing. There have been a few unforseeen causalities – I starved my basil to death, crushed my dill under a pile of washing and neglected my Jasmine until it resembled dry hay, but all in all, it’s been a successful harvest.
So, inspired by my gardening success, I thought I’d attempt to use some of my homegrown herbs in a recipe. As you all know, I crushed my dill in a horrifying laundry accident, but I still had mint, rosemary and thyme to play with… RIP dill.


Herby chickpea salad
Serves 4 as a side, 2 as a main / Hands on time 20 mins / Total time 20 mins / V Gf
Hummus dressing
2 tsp extra virgin olive oil
3 tsp balsamic vinegar
1 tsp honey
1 tsp wholegrain mustard
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 tbs shop bought hummus
For the chickpeas
1 can chickpeas, drained and rinsed
Juice of half a lemon
Handful of fresh mixed herbs, finely chopped or 1 tsp dried mixed herbs
For the salad
4 handfuls of leave (I used a mixture of rocket and spinach)
Handful Pumpkin seeds
1 beef tomato, chopped
1/4 of a cucumber, peeled and chopped
Pitted Kalamaka olives, halved
1/4 red onion, finely sliced
1 avocado, peeled and sliced
100g vegetarian feta, crumbled (optional)
Salt and pepper


V– Vegetarian    Gf– Gluten free


Method
1. Start by making the hummus dressing by mixing all of the ingredients in a small bowl with a spoon until fully combined. Put to one side.
2. Rinse and drain your chickpeas in a colander before squeezing over the lemon and seasoning well with salt and pepper. Mix in the fresh or dried herbs and put to one side.
3. In a large bowl, assemble your salad (you can use whatever salad bits you desire although I like to include feta and olives in mine to give it a Greek feel). Add the herby chickpeas and pour over the dressing before give it a good toss. Serve as a side or as a meal with a bit of hummus and pita bread.

Chickpea salad
Chickpea salad

If you’ve had a go at making my salad or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com

Bruschetta

Bruschetta
Bruscetta
Bruschetta

Let’s be honest, it’s too damn hot to cook this week, so I’ve been living off a nutritious diet of fresh tomatoes and gin and tonics. I was hoping to save this recipe for when my tomato plant started to produce fruit, but insultingly, he (my plant) has only produced two tiny green tomatoes so far, and that does not a bruschetta make. Selfish. Just remember who waters you, mate.
So instead, I scampered off to Waitrose and came back with a big bag of overpriced tomatoes, sourdough and enough tonic water and ice to sink HMS Belfast. Within 10 minutes I was chomping on delicious bruschetta and sipping ice cold G&Ts while staring daggers at my tomato plant. I’m not angry, just disappointed – he hangs his head in shame. 


Bruschetta
Serves 2 as a starter / Hands on time 10 mins / Total time 10 mins / V Vn Df
2 pieces of sourdough (I used a rye variety)
4 ripe tomatoes, de-seeded and roughly chopped
1 garlic clove, peeled
Handful of fresh basil, roughly chopped
1 tsp balsamic vinegar
Good quality extra virgin olive oil
Salt and pepper


V– Vegetarian    Vn– Vegan    Df – Dairy free   


Method
1. Start by de-seeding and roughly chopping your tomatoes – I do this by halving my tomatoes, removing the core and spooning out the seeds. Roughly chop and place in a bowl before sprinkling with a generous pinch of salt and pepper. Stir in the chopped basil, balsamic vinegar and a good drizzle of extra virgin olive oil. Put to one side.
2. Toast 2 large pieces of sourdough on either a grill pan or in a toaster. Meanwhile, cut the end off the garlic clove and peel. Once toasted, rub the toast with the cut side of the garlic to give it a gorgeous flavour. Finally sprinkle the toast with salt and pepper and drizzle with olive oil before topping with the tomato mixture. Tasty.

Bruscetta
Bruschetta

If you’ve had a go at making my bruschetta or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com

Braised vegetable orecchiette

Braised vegetable orecchiette
Braised vegetable orecchiette

As promised, I have returned from my gorgeous holiday in Puglia with more than just a few extra pounds and a sunburnt belly button – believe me, I’m as surprised as you are.
I come bearing gifts and the first one is this utterly delicious braised vegetable orecchiette. I discovered this dish on our last evening in Bari, in a pleasant little restaurant, next to a rather unpleasant fat Australian who moaned about her pasta being ‘too hard’. Philistine.
Anyway, it turned out that most of the vegetarian pasta dishes I had my eye on were unavailable, due to the ingredients being out of season. Eating seasonally is obviously a big part of Italian culture which is nice, but unfortunately for me, this meant that I was left with the rather dubiously named ‘vegetable pasta’. I didn’t want to show my disappointment, so I simply smiled and willed it to be more than just a bowl of vegetables and pasta.

It arrived and it was just a bowl of vegetables and pasta – but it was one of the nicest bowls of vegetables and pasta I had ever eaten. Local orecchiette floating in a salty vegetable broth peppered with seasonal vegetables. Bellissimo!

Braised vegetable orecchiette
Serves 2 / Hands on time 30mins/ Total time 30mins / Mf
25g unsalted butter
300g baby mixed vegetables (I used 1 small courgette, 2 chestnut mushrooms, 3 baby leeks, 4 baby carrots, 2 baby parsnips. Although you can use whatever vegetables you like)
100g orecchiette* or pasta of your choice
500ml vegetable stock (I used 1 Knorr stock pot)
2 bay leaves
1 tsp dried parsley
Extra virgin olive oil to serve
Small handful of grated parmesan* or vegetarian Italian hard cheese
Salt and pepper

Mf– Meat and fish free
*Orecchiette is a pasta that’s popular in Southern Italy and literally translates to ‘little ears’.
*Parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiani) is always made using animal rennet, therefore it is not vegetarian. Substitute for Italian hard cheese if applicable.


Method
1. Chop your vegetables to your desired size – personally I think the bigger the better, especially when braising. In a large heavy bottomed pot with a lid, add the butter and spread the vegetables out as evenly as you can. Cover with roughly 500ml of vegetable stock (you want to make sure the vegetables are only just covered). Season with salt and pepper and add the bay leaves.
2. Bring to the boil on a high heat before turning back down low and covering with a lid. Let the vegetables simmer for 10-12 minutes.
3. Meanwhile, in a separate pan, boil your pasta in slightly salted water and grate the parmesan.

4. Remove the lid off the vegetables, stir in a tsp of dried parsley and turn the heat back up and vigorous boil for another 3 minutes. Meanwhile drain your pasta and put to one side.
5. By now your vegetables will be lovely and soft. Take them off the heat and discard the bay leaves. Pour the pasta straight into the pot and stir through carefully – you don’t want to break the vegetables up too much.
6. Divide into bowls and serve with a drizzle of good quality extra virgin olive oil and a sprinkling of parmesan.
Braised vegetable orecchiette
Braised vegetable orecchiette

If you’ve had a go at making my orecchiette or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com


Thai green lentil soup

Thai green lentil curry
Thai green lentil curry
Thai green lentil curry
What could be better than boiling hot soup on a boiling hot day? Well, I apologise, but my cupboards were bare and I couldn’t be bothered to get the bus to Waitrose. So, instead, I sat in the sun and drank wine for nine straight hours, listening to The Little Mermaid soundtrack and crying – I don’t feel very well today.
Anyway, next week I’m off on hollibobs, so alas, you won’t be receiving a recipe from me, but expect something deliciously Italian on my return. In the meantime, let’s head to Asia and enjoy this rather tasty Thai green soup.

Thai green lentil soup
Serves 4 / Hands on time 20 mins / Total time 45 mins V Vn Gf Df  ❄🌶
1 tsp coconut oil
1 white onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
Knob of fresh ginger, grated
50g vegan and gluten free Thai green curry paste* (I use Blue Dragon)
1 can coconut milk
150g sweet potato, peeled and cut into chunks
150g dried green lentils
1 litre vegetable stock (I use 2 Knorr stock pots)
Handful of fresh coriander, including the stalks
Stick of lemon grass, bashed


V– Vegetarian    Vn– Vegan    Gf– Gluten free    Df– Dairy free    – Freezable   🌶– Spicy

 Suitable for home freezing once cooled. Consume within 3 months.
* Some Thai green curry pastes contain crustaceans and fish. Always check the label. 


Method
1. In a large cooking pot with a lid, sweat the chopped onions in the oil, over a medium to low heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally (add a dash of water if needed, to prevent burning).
2. Once soft, add the grated ginger, crushed garlic and the Thai green curry paste. Give it a good stir and cook for a couple of minutes. Add the sweet potato, coconut milk, stock, lentils and the bashed lemon grass and bring to the boil.
3. Turn down the heat and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Cut the storks off the bunch of coriander and add them to the soup. Cook for 5 more minutes. Finally take off the heat, fish out the lemon grass and blend – either with a hand blender or a food processor. Serve topped with chopped coriander leaves.

Thai green lentil curry
Thai green lentil curry

If you’ve had a go at making my Thai green lentil soup or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com



Healthy-ish loaded nachos

Healthy-ish loaded nachos
Healthy-ish loaded nachos
Healthy-ish loaded nachos

There is a fine line between those of us who can wear denim hot pants and those of us who can’t. I’m sure you can guess which category I fall into.
So, there I was, bending over to tie up my shoelaces, when I catch sight of what looked like the back of a large rhino. No, there must be some mistake, that cannot be MY arse?! I bolt upright only to see the cellulite on my thighs dimple even harder. ARGH! I quickly bend back over and stare at myself upside down, then from all angles. Three mirrors?! Three f***ing mirrors!!!! No one needs see their arse from that many angles. But the blood has started rushing to my head, so I decide to stand up and face the music.
I’m wearing what can only be described as a giant adult nappy made of denim. It’s high-waisted, and so short you can see my bum cheeks. When did denim shorts become so short? With only two weeks to go until my holiday, I decided to whip off the hot pants and do what any self respecting thirty-something would do in this situation.
Angrily drink three gin and tonics in quick succession at the nearest Weatherspoon’s. So what if my hot pants days are numbered? I hear culottes are back in fashion – a rather snazzy combination of the skirt and a short… Yes, they are as awful as they sound.
Failing that, I could try and just eat a little healthier. So, instead of fully loading my nachos with mountains of refried beans, guacamole and sour cream, I created this rather tasty, lighter version. Swapping shop-bought salty tortillas chips with my homemade version was surprisingly easy and delicious. I’ve favoured fresh avocado slices over guacamole and low-fat yoghurt instead of sour cream. To be honest, it felt just as indulgent, and has given me a good chance of squeezing into my snazzy new culottes. Well, it’s got to be better than wearing a denim nappy, right?


Healthy-ish loaded nachos
Serves 2 or 4 as a starter / Hands on time 40 mins / Total time 40 mins / V 🌶
1 tsp rapeseed oil (preferably in a spray bottle)
4 soft tortillas cut into eighths
Smoked paprika, to sprinkle
1/2 red onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, crushed
1/2 tsp cumin
1/2 tsp smoked paprika
1 can black beans, drained and rinsed
1 sweetcorn, kernels removed (or 1 small, drained can)
8 cherry tomatoes, quarters
2 spring onions, chopped
100g grated vegetarian cheddar
Handful fresh coriander, chopped
1 ripe avocado
1 lime
Low fat yogurt to serve (optional)
Handful of jalapeños to serve (optional)

V– Vegetarian    🌶– Spicy 

Method
1. Preheat the oven to 200°C/180°C fan/ 400F/gas mark 6. Stack the 4 tortillas on top of each other and cut them in half across the middle, then into quarters and then into eighths. Spread them out, onto 2 deep baking trays, trying to overlap them as little as possible.
2. Sprinkle with smoked paprika, season with salt and pepper and spray with oil (I bought an empty spray bottle and filled it with oil myself but don’t worry if you don’t have one, just drizzle with oil). Bake in the oven for 5 mins, before flipping them over and cooking for a further 5 mins. Remove and put to one side. Turn the oven off but turn the grill on a medium to high heat.
3. Sweat the red onion and the garlic in a little oil in a large pot. Add a bit of water to help the onions steam and to cook them faster. Once softened, add the cumin, smoked paprika, salt and pepper and cook for a further 2 mins. Add the drained black beans, the sweetcorn kernels*, a drop of water and give it a good stir. Season with salt and pepper and continue to cook for a further 5 minutes. *To remove the sweet corn kernels, simply stand the sweetcorn on it’s head and run a sharp knife carefully down the sides to remove them slowly (they tend to go everywhere so proceed with care).
4. Meanwhile, chop the spring onions, the tomatoes and grate the cheese ready for sprinkling.
5. Tip the tortilla chips into one baking tray and top with the cooked beans. Scatter with the tomatoes and spring onions and sprinkle with cheese.
6. Place under the grill for 3-5 minutes or until the cheese has melted. Meanwhile, roughly chop the coriander, slice the avocado and quarter the lime. Remove from the grill and top with the avocado, coriander, a good squeeze of lime. Serve scattered with jalapeños and with a side of yogurt.
Healthy-ish loaded nachos
Healthy-ish loaded nachos

If you’ve had a go at making my nachos or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com

Asparagus, pea & goats cheese risotto

Asparagus, pea and goats cheese risotto Final
Asparagus, pea and goats cheese risotto Final
Asparagus, pea and goats cheese risotto

It may have escaped your attention, but I have well over 150 recipes on this blog, and not one of those recipes is a risotto. Even just the word fills me with a despair, one which can only be trumped by the even-more-disappointing ‘stuffed pepper’. There’s nothing worse than a pepper stuffed with whatever scraps the restaurant chef can find – which, more often than not, is last night’s vegetarian option: risotto. NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!
Don’t get me wrong, a risotto can be a wonderful thing – but frankly, it rarely is. It’s the lazy vegetarian option that graces pub menus throughout the land, and has been given all the love and attention of some over-steamed veg at a carvary.

On a few occasions (and I know this sounds silly), I’ve been close to tears when I’ve looked up from my sickie bowl of stodge to see plates piled high with tender-looking roast beef, golden Yorkshire puddings, glazed carrots, crispy roast potatoes and glossy gravy. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not that I want to eat my boyfriend’s roast dinner, I just crave the same love and attention that went into making his meal. And, in my experience (and I’ve eaten a lot of risotto), that is rarely the case… Until recently.

After a day of exploring the Derbyshire countryside and eating our weight in Bakewell pudding, my boyfriend and I booked a table at The Manners in Bakewell. Starving, my eyes quickly devoured the menu only to fall upon the word I had been hoping not to see: ‘risotto’. My heart sank, and so did Jamie’s (he knows how upset risotto makes me).
“Maybe there’s a special on?” he said apologetically, turning in his chair to look for a board.
“There isn’t,” I replied glumly, looking at the starters to see if one could double up as a main. “They have a burrata salad – maybe I could have that with chips or something?” I added weakly, but Jamie could see my disappointment.
“Why don’t you just try the risotto?” he suggested tentatively.
“Why don’t you try it?!” I snapped accidentally, and instantly regretted it.
“Fine!” he hit back. “Let’s just go somewhere else – forget the fact we’ve been waiting an hour at the bar for this table and it’s almost nine o’clock.”
“Are you ready to order?” the kindly waiter interrupted. He had suddenly appeared by my side, pen poised and expectant look on his face.
“Er, yeah, sorry – I’ll have the burrata and the risotto,” I smiled weakly.

It. Was. Delicious. A creamy, dreamy bowl of perfectly cooked rice with bursts of fresh pea, asparagus and dill. With every mouthful, I discovered pockets of tangy goats cheese rind as well as subtle notes of lemon. Before I know it, Jamie had abandoned his meal and we are both digging into mine – and I didn’t mind one bit. For the first time in living memory, a pub risotto was finally worthy of centre stage. So I did something I thought I would never do – a risotto recipe. Pigs have flown. Enjoy!


Asparagus, pea and goats cheese risotto
Serves 4 / Hands on Time 1 hr 10 mins / Total time 1 hr 10 mins Gf Mf 
200g asparagus
1 onion, finely chopped
30g unsalted butter
2 garlic cloves, crushed
200g risotto rice
150ml white wine
800ml vegetable stock, I use Knorr
200g frozen peas
40g Parmesan* or vegetarian Italian hard cheese, grated
100g vegetarain goats cheese with rind, roughly chopped
Handful of fresh dill, chopped
Juice of half a lemon and zest

Gf– Gluten free    Mf– Meat and fish free    – Freezable
❄ Suitable for home freezing once cooled. Consume within 3 months.
*Parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiani) is always made using animal rennet, therefore it is not vegetarian. Substitute for Italian hard cheese if applicable.

Method
1. Discard the woody ends of the asparagus spears, chop in half and submerge in a small saucepan of boiling water. Cook for 4 minutes before draining and putting to one side.
2. Prepare all of the other ingredients, making risotto is pretty hands on so you want everything ready and to hand while cooking. Measure out, chop and grate everything you are going to need. Once your asparagus has cooled slightly, chop into chunks and put to one side with other ingredients.
3. In a large non stick pot, or saucepan with a lid, add the butter and sweat the onions down, on a low heat for around 10 minutes, with the lid on. Add the crushed garlic and continue to cook for a further few more minutes. Add the risotto rice and coat well in the buttery onion mixture before upping the heat to high. Stir continually for 3 minutes until the rice goes slightly translucent at the edges. Add all of the wine (it should fizz) and cook until the wine has absorbed.

4. Turn the heat down to medium and add a ladle of stock, stir until absorbed. Continue to add a ladle of stock one at a time and cook until each addition has been absorbed. Once all the stock has been incorporated, take off the heat.
5. Add the asparagus, peas, lemon juice, lemon zest, fresh dill, parmesan and the goats cheese. Mix well and cover with a lid and leave for 5 minutes. Finally uncover, season with salt and pepper and serve drizzled with extra virgin olive oil. 

Asparagus, pea and goats cheese risotto Final
Asparagus, pea and goats cheese risotto

If you’ve had a go at making my risotto or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com


Red pepper puttanesca

Red pepper puttanesca final
Red pepper puttanesca

Talk about online food shopping gone wrong. How on earth did I manage to order 4 red peppers the size of my head (no exaggeration). I know I’m relatively knew to the world of online shopping, but who even knew these freaky fruits existed? I stood staring in disbelief at the 4 ‘giant’ peppers lying higgledy-piggledy on my kitchen counter, dwarfing everything in their wake. At first, I laughed, until I checked my order and realised they were £3.95 EACH! Fifiteen effing pounds! I could have ordered a Domino’s pizza for that price.
“I do understand you’re upset, Ms Heale. However, the product name does state that these are giant peppers,” said Ocado.
“Yes, but ‘giant’ to me is just ‘a bit bigger than average’,” I protested. “What you gave me was a monstrosity, a freak of nature! I mean, who even knew peppers came in that size? I want my money back.”
“I will be unable to refund you on this occasion.”
“But on your website the picture doesn’t give any idea of scale. If you had photographed one of the peppers next to a small dog or held it up to someone’s face, then I would have realised!”
“I am sorry, we will not be able to offer a refund for these items, as there were no quality or damage issues.”
“Is it too late to say that they’re damaged?”
“Yes.”
“Damn it!”
So, I was stuck with them and, to make matters worse, I couldn’t even fit them in my fridge. Time was of the essence, these oafish fruits were not going to stay ripe for much longer, so I roasted the bastards and made this rather delicious puttanesca. Take that, Ocado!


Red pepper puttanesca
Serves 4 / Hands on time 25 mins / Total time 35-40 mins Mf 
100g dried spaghetti or gluten free alternative, per person
80g grated Parmesan*
Handful of fresh parsley, chopped
2 handfuls pitted black olives, halved
4 tsp of capers
Red pepper sauce 
1 tsp olive oil
1 jar of roasted red peppers (drained weight 350g)
1/4 tsp smoked paprika
1 white onion, roughly chopped
2 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1 tbs red wine
125ml vegetable stock, I use 1/2 a Knorr stock pot
2 tbs Greek yogurt


Mf– meat and fish free    – Freezable 
* Parmesan (Parmigiano Reggiani) is always made using animal rennet, therefore it is not vegetarian. Substitute for Italian hard cheese if applicable.
❄ The red pepper sauce is suitable for home freezing once cooled. Freeze for up to 3 months. 


Method 
1. Sweat the chopped onion and garlic in a tsp of oil on a medium to low heat until soft for about 10 minutes, adding a dash of water if required to help them steam and prevent burning. Once soft, add the paprika, season the onions with salt and continue to cook for a couple of minutes.
2. Roughly chop the drained peppers (discarding any seeds) and add to the onions. Pour in the wine and the stock and bring to the boil. Continue to cook for a further 10 mins. Take off the heat and add 2 tablespoons of water along with 2 tablespoons of yogurt. Blend with a hand-blender until smooth. Cover and put to one side.
3. Boil the pasta in salted water (100g per person) according to packet instructions. Meanwhile, grate the cheese and chop the olives and the fresh parsley. Once cooked, drain the pasta, give it a shake and pour straight into the red pepper sauce. Mix well and incorporate the olives and capers before serving in bowls topped with the cheese, fresh parsley and a good drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.

Red pepper puttanesca

If you’ve had a go at making my puttanesca or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com

5 minute mixed berry frozen yogurt

5 minute mixed berry frozen yogur
Mixed berry frozen yogurt
Mixed berry frozen yogurt

I have nothing else to say, other than it’s hot, it’s sweaty and I am very sunburnt. It’s time to cool down with some frozen yogurt. Easiest. Recipe. Ever! The frozen berries freeze the yoghurt as you blend, so no need to wait before diving in with a spoon. Who knew science was this cool – literally?


5 minute mixed berry frozen yogurt
Serves 2 / Hands on time 5 mins / Total time 5 mins V Gf
You’ll need: A food processor
200g mixed frozen berries
4 Tbs full fat Greek yogurt
1 tsp maple syrup or honey + extra for drizzle

Method
1 Assemble all ingredients in a food processor and blitz for about 30 seconds
or until the mixture is smooth.
2. Serve immediately in bowls topped with a few extra frozen berries, an extra dollop of Greek yogurt and a drizzle of maple syrup or honey.

Mixed berry frozen yogurt
Mixed berry frozen yogurt

If you’ve had a go at making my frozen yogurt or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com

Black & green olive tapenade

Black & green olive tapenape
Black & green olive tapenape
Black & green olive tapenade

Last Saturday, I had so much to do that I decided to do nothing. Instead, I stayed in bed and watched back-to-back episodes of Ally McBeal and ate Marmite on toast. It was the best weekend ever. I laughed, I cried, I even ‘laughied’, which is when you laugh and cry at the same time. Anyway, the next day I managed to peel myself out of bed having achieved nothing – unless you count the new litigation skills I learnt from watching so much Ally McBeal. I do.
Regardless of what an amazing lawyer I’m convinced I would make, it quickly dawned on me that I a) have no money and b) have no food – i.e. not a great start when you’re a food blogger. Luckily, I had just enough money to go to the corner shop and buy a few jars of olives. My friend Anne-Marie had recently asked me if I had a recipe for tapenade on my website, and I said no – so thought I’d do that. Later that day, I found myself back in bed, watching back-to-back episodes of Ally McBeal and eating two different types of tapenade on toast. What? At least I did something!


Black & green olive tapenade
Serves 6-8 / Hands on time 10 mins / Total time 10 mins / V Vn Gf Df 
You’ll need: A food processor
Black olive tapenade
200g (drained weight) pitted black olives in brine. I used a mix of Kalamata olives and black.
1 tsp capers
1 Tbs extra virgin olive oil
1 garlic clove, peeled and roughly chopped
1 tsp red wine vinegar
Juice of half a lemon
Small handful of chopped parsley to serve (optional)

Green olive tapenade
200g (drained weight) pitted green olives in brine
1 tsp capers
1 Tbs extra virgin olive oil
2 garlic cloves, peeled and roughly chopped
1 pickled jalapeño pepper, stalk removed
1 tsp white wine vinegar or cider vinegar
Juice of half a lemon
2 tsp pine nuts
Small handful of chopped parsley to serve (optional)
❄ Freeze on the day of making, in an air tight container. Defrost fully and consume within 3 days. Freeze for up to 3 months. 

Method (For both the green and the black tapenade)
Drain the olives and put them in a food processor along with the other ingredients, leaving out the parsley. Blitz until you have your desired texture, I like my tapenade quite coarse so keep the blitzing to a minimum. Serve on toast, sprinkled with freshly chopped parsley and drizzled with extra virgin olive oil.

Black & green olive tapenape
Black & green olive tapenape

If you’ve had a go at making my tapenade or any of my other recipes, I’d love to hear about it @corrieheale corrie.heale@gmail.com